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Cornish people formally declared a national minority along with Scots, Welsh and Irish

coldalbion:

utherben:

coldalbion:

Hah. Proper job.

Excellent news, especially the bolded bit below:

The ruling is the culmination of a long battle to assert a distinct Cornish identity which saw 84,000 people declare themselves “Cornish” in the 2011 Census following a campaign for the designation to be added to the form. A further 41 per cent of pupils in Cornwall’s schools described themselves as Cornish in a 2011 school survey – up from 34 per cent two years earlier.

The Cornish language, which until 2010 was classified as extinct by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation, is also enjoying a robust revival, with 557 people claiming the Celtic dialect as their main language.

Sadly my Penzance peeps aren’t part of the 557, but they’re very tapped into the local culture & are no doubt incredibly chuffed about this.

And rightly so. The revival of Kernewek and Kernow in general is something great for all of us born and raised down there, and even if we no longer live there, it’s always there in our Soul.

sixpenceee:

sixpenceee:

jdmookami:

sixpenceee:

The Sound of Silence is a horror games that dynamically adapts to a person’s greatest fear. It will deliver a different experience to each player. The game is said to be released in early 2014.

You can view the full concept idea of it here: X

I wish to play this game. Like right now. No one knows my deepest fears, not even me. This shall be good

^^^ 

THIS

I WAS SO HAPPY WHEN I GOT THIS MESSAGE

sixpenceee:

solunais:

sixpenceee:

Some followers suggested this to me.

The island known as the “island of madness”, “hell” and “the most haunted place on Earth” is being sold!

Here’s a quick, history behind it:

The plagued people were shipped off to Poveglia Island, a small, secluded land mass that floats between Venice and Lido. There, people lived out the last of their wretched lives together until they died.

Since the island already reeked of death, the next time an epidemic came along, barely alive bodies were dumped there and burned in mass graves.

In the 20s, a mental hospital was built to welcome the island’s newest “guests,” or anybody that showed symptoms of any sort of sickness, physical or mental.

Basically, if you had an itch, away you went to Poveglia where you’d sink your feet into the soil (half dirt, half human ash) and be in the company of over 100K diseased ghosts.

It didn’t help when the place was converted into a hospital for the mentally ill in 1922. Rumor has it, the hospital was home to a number of crude lobotomies, performed by a doctor who’d been driven mad by the ghosts. He later flung himself off the bell tower.

The Italian government is now offering a 99-year lease to whomever’s brave enough to take it over. The italian government thinks it would make a great hotel destination!

SOURCE

"Build a hotel" they said. "It will be fun" they said. 

The start of a real life shining everyone

airakanke:

tiffanydraws:

Read from right to left :)

This is a little manga I wrote to show how a girl’s efforts to make someone hurting smile ends up revealing a similar compassion from the very boy she was trying to comfort. It shows how a little kindness can sometimes seem pointless but it can be contagious and turn around to help the person giving it more than the one receiving it. 

SDOHUFodshuf omg this is so so so so so cute I love iiiit ahhh

13 of Gabriel García Márquez' Most Powerful Quotes to Remember Him By

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Colombian novelist and Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez, who died Thursday at the age of 87, wrote some of the most beautiful words ever put to paper. If you studied Spanish, if you studied English, if you studied literature of any kind, you likely read some of them. 

Two of his greatest literary achievements were Love in the Time of Choleraand One Hundred Years of Solitude — a novel that some argue contains the mostbeautiful opening sentence of all time: “Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendia was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice.” 

Those beautiful words are only one example of the incredible linguistic and literary legacy García Márquez leaves behind. Considered the father of magical realism and the most important Spanish-language author since Miguel de Cervantes in the 17th century, García Márquez’ powerful impact on the literary world will not be soon forgotten. 

Enjoyed by readers of all generations, García Márquez’ words and language often offer the best advice for young people. Here are some of his greatest insights to carry with you, on life and love. 

1. On existence

"It’s enough for me to be sure that you and I exist at this moment." — One Hundred Years of Solitude 

2. On inspiration

"If I had to give a young writer some advice I would say to write about something that has happened to him; it’s always easy to tell whether a writer is writing about something that has happened to him or something he has read or been told." — The Art of Fiction

3. On children

"She discovered with great delight that one does not love one’s children just because they are one’s children but because of the friendship formed while raising them." — Love in the Time of Cholera

4. On happiness

"No medicine cures what happiness cannot.” 

5. On aging

"It is not true that people stop pursuing dreams because they grow old, they grow old because they stop pursuing dreams.” 

6. On marriage

"The problem with marriage is that it ends every night after making love, and it must be rebuilt every morning before breakfast." — Love in the Time of Cholera 

7. On memory

"What matters in life is not what happens to you but what you remember and how you remember it.”

8. On regret

"Tell him yes. Even if you are dying of fear, even if you are sorry later, because whatever you do, you will be sorry all the rest of your life if you say no." — Love in the Time of Cholera

9. On memories

"No matter what, nobody can take away the dances you’ve already had." — Memories of My Melancholy Whores

10. On death

"A person doesn’t die when he should but when he can." — One Hundred Years of Solitude

11. On wisdom

"Wisdom comes to us when it can no longer do any good." — Love in the Time of Cholera 

12. On poetry

"He repeated until his dying day that there was no one with more common sense, no stonecutter more obstinate, no manager more lucid or dangerous, that a poet." — Love in the Time of Cholera 

13. On love

"There is always something left to love." —One Hundred Years of Solitude

Source: Elena Sheppard for Policy Mic

guardian:

Gabriel García Márquez, Nobel laureate writer, dies aged 87

The Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez, who unleashed the worldwide boom in Spanish literature with his novel 100 Years of Solitude, has died at the age of 87, a person close to the family has said. García Márquez had been admitted to hospital in Mexico City on 3 April with pneumonia. Full story

Pictured: Gabriel García Márquez at his house in Mexico City, 2010. Photograph: Miguel Tovar/AP

(Source: theguardian.com)

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